Surviving 2009 Together

I often assess the passing year as the new one approaches. I have mixed feelings about 2009. The start of the year, like the second half of 2008, was really scary at the RFC. The country was in financial melt-down, people were losing their jobs, and that had ominous implications for our fund raising prospects as the year progressed.

Children of Reproductive Rights and Civil Rights Activists Receive New Grants along with Young Environmental Activist

We just completed our spring granting cycle and I’m happy to welcome two new beneficiary families and another targeted activist youth to our community. These new grantees include:

New Grants for Children of Environmental, Prisoners' Rights, and Human Rights Activists

We just completed awarding our last grants of 2014 at the RFC. In all, seven new grantees joined the RFC community this fall (five families and two targeted activist youth). I described some of these families in an earlier post here). The additional new grantees include:

New Grants for Children of Environmental, Labor and Human Rights Activists

We just completed awarding our first grants of 2015 at the RFC. In all, seven new grantees joined the RFC community this spring (five families, one targeted activist youth and one group). The new grantees include:

June 19, 2017: Honoring Ethel and Julius and Anne and Abel

On this 64th anniversary of the execution of my grandparents, I’m struck by a related milestone that passed without fanfare a few months ago: the 60th anniversary of my dad and uncle’s adoption by Anne and Abel Meeropol. Taken together, these events capture the spirit of the Rosenberg Fund for Children. My father founded the RFC to honor his birth parents’ resistance and to repay the community which allowed him and his older brother to flourish despite the devastation visited on their family.

Guest Blog: Bridging Education and Activism

(Guest blog by former RFC beneficiary Davíd Morales)

I remember the exact moment I received the email from school admin, a couple of days before my high school graduation, notifying me that I would not be participating in the commencement ceremony. My heart raced while reading it and then sank at the thought of my immigrant parents, who had sacrificed so much, not being able to see their first child walk across the stage.