Angels in America

Last weekend Elli and I had the privilege of seeing both parts of Tony Kushner’s brilliant play Angels in America in New York City. This is a marathon: two 3½ hour segments separated by a 2½ hour break. I was mesmerized by this revival of the original 1993 production, but I don’t intend to review the play in this blog. Instead I’ll focus on one small, but important, interaction that takes place late in its second part.

From a Cartoon Cat to the White House, the Rosenbergs Are Still With Us

(guest blog by RFC Communications Director, Amber Black)

For people who have been gone for almost 65 years, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg turn up in the news and pop culture a lot…and in some surprising ways.

Finally Seeing Angels in America

Last week Angels in America closed after a triumphant, award-winning revival on Broadway, more than a quarter century after it first took the theater world by storm. During Angels’ first Broadway run, I was in college and deliberately avoided the press or any discussion about the play. I was writing my thesis, which explored the frames of meaning—historical, legal, cultural, etc.—in my  grandparents’ case with a focus on how they impacted the representation and understanding of my grandmother.

The Rosenberg and Strange Fruit "Mention of the Day"

(guest blog by RFC Communications Director, Amber Black)

Two topics consistently engage our supporters more than any others: the case of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg and the song “Strange Fruit.” It’s been 65 years since the parents of our founder were executed, and 80 years since Abel Meeropol (the man who along with his wife Anne, adopted the Rosenbergs’ orphaned sons) wrote the anti-lynching anthem first as a poem and then set it to music.

But all these decades later, both the case and the song pop up virtually every day in a huge array of contexts including hard news and popular culture. So we’ve begun to spotlight them in a “Strange Fruit” and Rosenberg “Mention of the Day” on our social media.